Parliament must have its say

File photo: Government and Opposition MPs at the ceremonial opening of the 12th Parliament at the Red House in August last year. Photo courtesy Office of the Parliament
File photo: Government and Opposition MPs at the ceremonial opening of the 12th Parliament at the Red House in August last year. Photo courtesy Office of the Parliament

THE EDITOR: Given the overwhelming public interest and debate about the peculiar circumstances which led to the appointments and eventual rejection by the courts, of both Mr Griffith and Mr Jacob as acting police commissioner, one would have thought the parties involved in the imbroglio, would have eagerly grasped the opportunity to come to the public and clear the air from the stifling cloud of suspicion.

This is especially considering the seriousness of the allegations involved and their potentially corrosive nature to the essential trust and confidence on which the country survives.

Unfortunately, the chairman and members of the Police Service Commission chose to blissfully resign and bite their tongues, rather than frontally face public scrutiny and justify their course of action.

What’s worst, following the court’s declaration on the unconstitutionality of the selected appointment process, several people in high public office all synchronously chose to defiantly chastise the media, commentators and even the judge, rather than accept responsibility and apologise for the roles they played in the disastrous process.

In fact, one would be forgiven for comparing the President’s opaque and reproachful statement to that of her predecessor’s “armchair critic” assertion, as they similarly reek of an aristocratic and regal flair – “how dare you ignorant peasants, question the chair!”

However, be advised that such sentiments are no longer welcomed here. In the age of social media and instant news, the population is equally entitled to express their views especially on matters of national interest and importance.

The President must no longer delay, but follow the court’s ruling and submit whatever lists she may have so that Parliament can have its say.

ANDRE PHILLIP

BARATARIA

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"Parliament must have its say"

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