Psychologist offers alternative activities for families for Easter

In this November 2020 photo, moviegoers wait to buy tickets at  the MovieTowne, Port of Spain box office when the cineplex reopened after months of covid19 restrictions. FIle photo by Sureash Cholai
In this November 2020 photo, moviegoers wait to buy tickets at the MovieTowne, Port of Spain box office when the cineplex reopened after months of covid19 restrictions. FIle photo by Sureash Cholai

After public disapproval of the mass gathering of young people at MovieTowne, Port of Spain for the premiere of Godzilla vs Kong over the weekend, counselling psychologist Camille Campbell offered a few alternative activities for students and their parents for the Easter holiday.

Campbell was speaking at the Ministry of Health’s virtual press conference on Monday.

She said even when a new movie comes out and everyone is excited about the release, the public should still be reminded of covid19 protocols. People can aim to watch the movie during downtimes, she said,such as a late showing, or even delay gratification by waiting to see it at a later date to avoid the crowds.

Campbell also recommended other activities parents can do with their children.

“Take a road trip,” she said. “We can become creative as parents, so we can have that sense of normalcy.”

She also suggested going to the beach during downtime such as later in the afternoon when people are leaving. Group or family activities like building kites were another recommendation.

Also, “We can still spend time with family on social media. It is a great tool to keep us connected.”

She also advised visiting local tourist attractions, many of which have implemented covid19 restrictions.

Epidemiologist Dr Avery Hinds said moving into the holiday season, with students at home, and people looking to travel, the public still needs to maintain the measures in place to protect themselves and others.

“We’ve seen pictures round social media of people gathering in public spaces,” he said. “Again, it is understandable that people want to get out, but we have to remember we are still in the midst of a pandemic…As we relax on measures, we give the virus opportunities to spread.”

Campbell said people followed restrictions in the beginning out of fear of the unknown.

“They were wiping shoes, groceries; people were strict on not visiting family…One year later, people have become accustomed. That’s a dangerous place to be, as the virus is still a real threat.

“I have found that when we are at these moments of frustration, it is important to focus on the initial goal…Your unguarded moment can have adverse consequences.”

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