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Monday 16 September 2019
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National Geographic crew amazed by local ecosystem

A crew from National Geographic Travellers explores the Main Ridge Forest Reserve with local tour guides last Friday. PHOTO COURTESY TOBAGO TOURISM AGENCY
A crew from National Geographic Travellers explores the Main Ridge Forest Reserve with local tour guides last Friday. PHOTO COURTESY TOBAGO TOURISM AGENCY

A production team from National Geographic Travellers was left stunned by the wide diversity of the ecosystems in Tobago. During their final day of filming, last Friday, in phase two of a marketing initiative by the Tobago Tourism Agency Ltd (TTAL), the production team expressed amazement that a small island like Tobago housed up to 240 species of birds, 640 species of plants and 160 tree species. They also appreciated how easily accessible the island's ecosystems, popular attractions and historical sites are for locals and visitors.

Newsday was told the team, which left on Friday, visited the Argyle, Parlatuvier, and Castara waterfalls.

This was the National Geographic's second visit to Tobago. In May, the team began filming a number of popular historical sites along the eastern end of Tobago.

The team along with TTAL CEO Louis Lewis, on Thursday, also visited the oldest protected forest reserve in the Western Hemisphere, Tobago's Main Ridge Forest Reserve.

Local tour guide William Trim chats with a crew from National Geographic Travellers. PHOTO COURTESY TOBAGO TOURISM AGENCY

Local tour guide William Trim, who assisted the production team, told Newsday, "When we went to the rainforest, we were able to get some lovely birds, both at the rainforest and at the waterfall, and seven to nine other species."

Trim said this is not the first time Tobago's ecosystem has been featured globally and he believes this additional exposure will help sell the the island to nature lovers.

"It was quite a privilege to be a part of marketing the product. Seems to me National Geographic will be able to push Tobago's beautiful scenery. I am happy TTAL has teamed up with them."

National Geographic Travellers was invited by the TTAL as a marketing initiative to highlight Tobago's culture, people, sites, food and popular attractions. During the first phase of the production, several locals were interviewed. The team also captured aerial and underwater footage of some historical and pristine sites.

This final content will be featured on National Geographic Traveller's website, their print and digital platforms.

TTAL CEO Louis Lewis said this move is strategic in the rebranding of "Destination Tobago."

He added, "Tobago, it is integral to create content aligned with our core pillars that illustrate Tobago as the unspoilt, untouched and undiscovered Caribbean island, where one can explore the extraordinary.

"We are excited to partner with such an iconic publication with a stellar reputation in travel and tourism, and we look forward to the resulting content that we can share with the rest of the world."

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