N Touch
Wednesday 26 September 2018
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Commentary

Powerful preschoolers

Diary of a mothering worker

Entry 292

DR GABRIELLE HOSEIN

IMAGINE YOUR little one in a preschool graduation. The room is decorated with sparkly “congratulations” signs and balloons. The children are fresh-faced and lovely.

Reading Rainbow Preschool from San Fernando has been doing this for 23 years. Ziya had a school celebration when she moved on, but it wasn’t Americanised, as is fashionable now, with gowns and caps and all.

Here, at my first time attending a formal “graduation” of this kind, there weren’t any gowns, just lacy white dresses, socks and shoes for girls, and little boys in crisp white shirts, black pants and black ties. It was classic Caribbean propriety for children, the kind that makes respectable grandparents feel all is still right with the world.

I was there as a guest speaker, following in the footsteps of school principals Patricia Ramgoolam and Dr Michael Dowlath, politicians such as Razia Ahmed and Gillian Lucky, and past mayor Gerald Ferreira.

Sitting to my left was Rev Joy Abdul-Mohan, who not only spoke at the first graduation, but who suggested the school motto: Do the best…to be the best.

On my right was boxing world champion Ria Ramnarine. Her story of pursuing martial arts as a young girl, despite family wishes, is legendary. In an excellent skit, little Ria pretended to knock out her opponent in the cutest way imaginable, with the whole room of parents beaming with pride and laughter.

Later, her biography was recited while she received her gold belt.

One scene depicted a courthouse where lawyer Kamla Persad-Bissessar, dressed in yellow, and Justice Paula Mae-Weekes, in robes, disciplined bad driver “Motilal Baboolal.” In other scenes, Shanntol Ince, paraolympic swimmer, and Jean Pierre, acted out their winning athletics, receiving awards while tiny presenters described their achievements.

For the past two years, the Institute for Gender and Development Studies (IGDS) has helped organise a march for International Women’s Day. Scene Three was this march for women’s rights, gender equality and an end to violence against women. There were about eight children who all received placards handed out by a teacher, encouraging their learning about protest for peace and justice.

The first march took place exactly 60 years ago in San Fernando. I knew that we were continuing its legacy, but I didn’t believe I’d ever see feminist struggles taught in preschool. Tears kind of came to my eyes.

On stage, Rev Joy and two IGDS faculty, Prof Rhoda Reddock and myself, were interviewed by, of course, little Akash Samaroo and Khamal Georges.

The children’s lines consisted of actual text from the press. The little girl, whose costuming made her look uncannily like me, recited March 2018 data on one in three women experiencing violence in their lifetime. She provided accurate analysis, focusing on gender and economic inequality and failure of services.

On stage, little Joy was dressed in her make-believe priest’s collar. Humorously, Rev Joy herself looked exactly the same. I was won over by the idea of a preschool graduation all at once, if this is what they would be.

Children portrayed beauty queens and iconic singers such as Daisy Voisin, Drupatee Ramgoonai and Calypso Rose. Impressively, ignoring homophobia, Michelle-Lee Ahye was also honoured and adorably displayed by a girl with braids, and a flag for a cape, highlighting that women’s achievements really can most matter.

In my talk, I celebrated five other women whose steps we should also follow.

First, Anacoana. Haitian Taino queen and mother who fought the Spanish to her death. She was only 29 years old. Second, Queen Nanny of the Maroons, an Asante who escaped plantation slavery and is considered to have freed another thousand enslaved Africans in colonial Jamaica. Third, Claudia Jones, born in Belmont, the mother of Notting Hill Carnival, and so influential in the international Communist Party that she’s buried to immediately left of Karl Marx, Communism’s founder.

Fourth, Dr Stella Abidh, the first Indo-Trinidadian woman to become a doctor despite Presbyterian clergy’s protestations against women’s advanced education. Her father was a unionist and county council representative who supported her dream. Fifth, Ruth Seukeran, former San Fernando councillor and political organiser whom few know was one of the speakers at the first International Women’s Day march, organised by Christina Lewis and the Caribbean Women’s National Assembly, in 1958.

Preschool education is more powerful than I credited, and the ideas more progressive than I’d ever hoped. Sparkly congratulations to preschools that put such love and commitment to making not only children and parents but path-breaking women honoured and proud.

motheringworker@gmail.com

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